Logo Radboud Universiteit

Vacatures geplaatst door Radboud Universiteit

Mimir verzorgt het geautomatiseerde beheer van vacatures op vacaturebanken voor Radboud Universiteit.

Laatste vacatures

PhD Candidate: Computational Cognitive Neuroscience – Decision Confidence

Almost every decision we make is accompanied by a feeling of confidence – a subjective assessment of how likely we are to be correct. This feeling of confidence allows us to evaluate our decisions and adjust our actions accordingly. Imagine you are about to cross a busy street. You rely on your sight and hearing to gauge if an oncoming truck will stop in time. But what factors influence your confidence in that judgment, and how does that confidence shape your next actions? This PhD project seeks to unravel the computations and neural mechanisms of these complex processes.

As a PhD candidate, you will also have the opportunity to develop valuable skills by mentoring students, participating in international conferences, and collaborating with leading researchers in the field. We offer access to state-of-the-art facilities and resources, and a supportive environment for your academic and professional development. Your teaching load may be up to 5% of your working time.

0 sollicitaties
0 views


21-05-2024 Radboud Universiteit
PhD Candidate: The Interplay of Experience and Concreteness in Smell and Flavour Languages

The Centre for Language Studies (CLS) is looking for a PhD candidate for a project on the interplay of experience and concreteness in smell and flavour languages. We offer you the opportunity to develop and carry out your own PhD project within the areas of expertise of your supervisors (Prof. Margot van Mulken, Dr Ilja Croijmans and Dr Laura Speed). The project will be funded by a Starters Grant from the Faculty of Arts awarded to Dr Ilja Croijmans.

Humans are bombarded with perceptual information across sensory modalities. How do we communicate about these sensory experiences? For some sensory modalities, for example vision, we have a fairly extensive abstract vocabulary, with classes and categories (e.g. shape or colour words) that can be used to describe qualities of an object without mentioning specific other objects. For smell and flavour, abstract vocabularies that span the sensory space do not exist, at least not in most Western languages. People speaking these languages refer to concrete objects (‘smells like citrus’) or merely comment on whether they like the smell or not. People usually struggle to talk about what they smell and taste. At the same time, people with smell and taste expertise, for example wine experts, are able to describe why they like what they smell and taste, in addition to whether they like it or not, even though they do not have access to extensive abstract vocabulary. Experts seem able to work with the limits of their language to convey what they perceive, for example by referring to very specific objects (‘smells like bergamot’). But what strategies these experts use exactly and what effect this type of language has on the perceiver is still unclear. Non-experts may also be limited in how they comprehend language about smell. Research has shown people have difficulty activating mental representations of smells when they read smell words.

The aim of this project is to investigate the language produced and understood by people differing in experience with smells and flavours, and to what extent the level of concreteness of the words used plays a role in comprehension as well as persuasiveness of communication about smell and flavour.

As a PhD candidate, you will investigate the effect of specific, smell-related experiences on the way people use and comprehend language about smells and flavours. Your research will be informed by theories of embodied language processing, which propose that perceptual experience influences the mental representations underlying word meaning. You will conduct experiments with groups of experts and novices. The focus of the project can be on language production (e.g. describing wine smell and flavour), comprehension (e.g. assessing what kind of mental representations smell language activates), consumer decision making (e.g. the effect of descriptions on consumer behaviour), or a combination of the three.

As a PhD candidate at the Centre for Language Studies (CLS), you will be part of the Graduate School for the Humanities (GSH). Up to 75% of your time will be devoted to the research for and writing of your PhD thesis. The remaining 25% will be spent on training and academic service to the Faculty of Arts, including teaching.

2 sollicitaties
0 views


21-05-2024 Radboud Universiteit
PhD Candidate: Small Molecule RNA Targeting

RNA is an essential biomolecular polymer that exhibits many cellular functions that are crucial for life, ranging from catalytic to informational. The recently discovered versatile cellular functions of RNA have rendered RNA an interesting target for therapy. In particular, the prospect of targeting RNA with small molecule modulators offers great promise for tackling currently challenging diseases. Traditional drug molecules have mainly been designed to target proteins. In the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Doctoral Training network 'TargetRNA' we will develop selective drugs that target RNA instead.

As a PhD candidate, you will work on the development of new methods to study RNA targeting. This PhD position will be part of a large European consortium focusing on developing drug molecules that target RNA. In this particular position, the focus will be on developing new methods that will enable quantifying interactions between small molecule drugs and RNA targets of interest.

This research combines biochemical techniques, including gel electrophoresis; PCR; cell culture; RNAseq and analytical methods such as fluorescence spectroscopy; MALDI-TOF; and HPLC. Interest in Organic Chemistry is preferred.

You will communicate your findings through publications in peer-reviewed journals and at international conferences. You will also be involved in training and teaching BSc and MSc students.

3 sollicitaties
0 views


21-05-2024 Radboud Universiteit
PhD Candidate: Computational Cognitive Neuroscience – Decision Confidence

Almost every decision we make is accompanied by a feeling of confidence – a subjective assessment of how likely we are to be correct. This feeling of confidence allows us to evaluate our decisions and adjust our actions accordingly. Imagine you are about to cross a busy street. You rely on your sight and hearing to gauge if an oncoming truck will stop in time. But what factors influence your confidence in that judgment, and how does that confidence shape your next actions? This PhD project seeks to unravel the computations and neural mechanisms of these complex processes.

As a PhD candidate, you will also have the opportunity to develop valuable skills by mentoring students, participating in international conferences, and collaborating with leading researchers in the field. We offer access to state-of-the-art facilities and resources, and a supportive environment for your academic and professional development. Your teaching load may be up to 5% of your working time.

1 sollicitatie
0 views


21-05-2024 Radboud Universiteit
PhD Candidate: The Interplay of Experience and Concreteness in Smell and Flavour Languages

The Centre for Language Studies (CLS) is looking for a PhD candidate for a project on the interplay of experience and concreteness in smell and flavour languages. We offer you the opportunity to develop and carry out your own PhD project within the areas of expertise of your supervisors (Prof. Margot van Mulken, Dr Ilja Croijmans and Dr Laura Speed). The project will be funded by a Starters Grant from the Faculty of Arts awarded to Dr Ilja Croijmans.

Humans are bombarded with perceptual information across sensory modalities. How do we communicate about these sensory experiences? For some sensory modalities, for example vision, we have a fairly extensive abstract vocabulary, with classes and categories (e.g. shape or colour words) that can be used to describe qualities of an object without mentioning specific other objects. For smell and flavour, abstract vocabularies that span the sensory space do not exist, at least not in most Western languages. People speaking these languages refer to concrete objects (‘smells like citrus’) or merely comment on whether they like the smell or not. People usually struggle to talk about what they smell and taste. At the same time, people with smell and taste expertise, for example wine experts, are able to describe why they like what they smell and taste, in addition to whether they like it or not, even though they do not have access to extensive abstract vocabulary. Experts seem able to work with the limits of their language to convey what they perceive, for example by referring to very specific objects (‘smells like bergamot’). But what strategies these experts use exactly and what effect this type of language has on the perceiver is still unclear. Non-experts may also be limited in how they comprehend language about smell. Research has shown people have difficulty activating mental representations of smells when they read smell words.

The aim of this project is to investigate the language produced and understood by people differing in experience with smells and flavours, and to what extent the level of concreteness of the words used plays a role in comprehension as well as persuasiveness of communication about smell and flavour.

As a PhD candidate, you will investigate the effect of specific, smell-related experiences on the way people use and comprehend language about smells and flavours. Your research will be informed by theories of embodied language processing, which propose that perceptual experience influences the mental representations underlying word meaning. You will conduct experiments with groups of experts and novices. The focus of the project can be on language production (e.g. describing wine smell and flavour), comprehension (e.g. assessing what kind of mental representations smell language activates), consumer decision making (e.g. the effect of descriptions on consumer behaviour), or a combination of the three.

As a PhD candidate at the Centre for Language Studies (CLS), you will be part of the Graduate School for the Humanities (GSH). Up to 75% of your time will be devoted to the research for and writing of your PhD thesis. The remaining 25% will be spent on training and academic service to the Faculty of Arts, including teaching.

0 sollicitaties
0 views


21-05-2024 Radboud Universiteit